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Examples (19 posts)

What does  “mobile-to-web cross login with a QR code” mean ? It is one of the approaches for the two-factor authentication. Suppose that a user is already authenticated in your application (in my example it would be an android app) and the user wants to use it’s actual session to perform an automatic authentication in another application (in my case it’s a web app). There are several examples of popular apps which use this approach. For example, to login into a web session with WhatsАpp, you must login on your phone and then scan a QR code in the web interface.login with qr1 - How to implement mobile-to-web cross login using a QR code

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With the introduction of the real-time database, Backendless is a great platform for developing games, especially multi-user ones. In this series of posts, I will be showing to you how to build a game for iOS with Swift using Backendless. For a quick overview of the game in action, please watch the video below:

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Posted in Examples, iOS

Backendless SDK for iOS has received several improvements which increased the portability of our code. As a result, the same library you use for the iOS apps can also be used in tvOS and watchOS apps. All the functionality available in our SDK is available in these two environment, this includes real-time database and real-time messaging. The Backendless APIs are the same as for iOS when using them in tvOS and watchOS apps.  Below is a video with a demo of a tvOS app which shows the real-time database in action. The source code of the application demonstrated in the video is available at:

https://github.com/Backendless/AppleTvDemo

This is a very exciting improvement for the SDK as it opens up new opportunities for the developers who look to expand their reach to different types of Apple devices.

Posted in Examples, iOS, tvOS, Video

Video broadcasting and streaming is one of the coolest features of Backendless. Our Media Service API enables client-server functionality for working with live and on-demand audio and video content. A mobile application which uses the Media Service API can broadcast audio and video from the device’s cameras and microphone. Backendless automatically handles streaming of the received media content to other clients or recording of the content on the server. The API can also support the capability to stream a pre-recorded (on-demand) content managed by the Media Service. More details about these features are available in the Media Service documentation.

This post describes how to build an iOS application using the Swift language. The app will record a video on the server and then subsequently play it back.

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In my previous post I reviewed the user registration API. Now that you know how to use the registration API and have a registered user, the next step is to review the login functionality. The video below focuses on the apps’ login screen and the Backendless Login API.

In the video below I review the code for the User Registration screen of the RestaurantToGo sample app. Additionally, I discuss the usage of the Backendless Registration API. In the previous post and video, I reviewed the process of setting up the development environment for the application.

Earlier this year I wrote about building a sample to demonstrate various APIs of the platform. There is also a post describing the database schema and app’s storyboard. The application is now ready and I will be posting a video tutorial detailing every step of building an app, including the following:

  1. Development environment setup
  2. User registration screen and API
  3. Login screen and API
  4. Using Backendless code generation for Android
  5. Retrieving and displaying data (listing of restaurants, locations and menus)
  6. Order summary and order confirmation

At the end of the tutorial, you will know how to build a data-driven app with Backendless, how to use the User Service APIs (registration, login, email confirmation), with with the relational persistent data, use Backendless console to manage data objects.

Below is an introductory video where you can see the complete app in action.

Posted in Android, Examples

A few posts ago I published a proposed schema for the database design for a sample app which can process mobile to–go orders. As the first step in building the application, I put together a rather simplistic user interface mockup for the future app. You can see the mockup below:RestaunrantAppScreeens - Designing the restaurant app: UI mockups

The UI is not a distant departure from the database schema. The only change I can think of is the introduction of the “cuisine type” for the Restaurant entity. See the updated schema below:restaurant schema - Designing the restaurant app: UI mockups

The next step will be a series of posts where we design the client-side of the app for Android and iOS. Additionally, we will be exploring and reviewing various Backendless features as we move along.

Posted in Examples

As we are progressing with the feature a day blog series, I thought it would be a good idea to come up with a fictional app which I could use in the feature posts. The idea for the app I will use as an example is a restaurant ordering system. Using the app a customer (who would need to register and login) can choose a restaurant, browse the menu and submit an order. A restaurant owner would be able to login and see the orders. Additionally, the owner would be able to run a report to calculate daily revenue. The design for the app will be evolving as we go, however to start with something I put together a class diagram which shows the core entities present in the system:restaurant model - Building a restaurant app using Backendless

There are plenty of things we can add to the application. I can think of restaurant/menu recommendations, customer reviews, integration with payment systems, etc. This should be fun!

Back for round #2, eh? (if you missed the first post which was about registering users, read it here) Well, let’s dive in. This one should be pretty quick.

The following code is pretty well commented, ping me if you have any questions.

This should bring back something similar to:

Notice the Backendless specific things, we didn’t create those fields in our previous post when we added this user to the database.

  • objectId
  • userStatus

Don’t panic, Backendless adds these automatically. Here’s our expected fields we created in the first post:

  • username
  • email
  • password…..wait, what the?!?! Where’s the password?!

I was expecting to be able to see the password when we query the user info, however, for security Backendless encrypts the password info in a one-way method that even they (or you as the admin of your user table) can’t retrieve. If a user forgets their password, you’ll have to build in the functionality for them to reset it.

I don’t have all the answers, so I hit up their great community and got a response. Check my post here for a more in depth explanation of their encryption.

How do you get the data to compare what the user is entering VS what’s stored on the backend? That’s where the login functionality comes in to play. We’ll hit that up in the next post.

My mission is to keep these posts nice and bite-sized. I don’t want to overwhelm you with tons of functionality. I’m mirroring Backendless’s docs for the REST API.

See you soon!

Mario

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