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Examples (34 posts)

ReactJS is one of the best and most popular frontend frameworks available for app builders. The barriers to entry in terms of understanding how to develop an app with ReactJS are very low, which is why many JavaScript developers choose the ReactJS library for web or mobile applications. It also works very well with a large number of data providers. Therefore, today we are beginning a series of articles about “How to use Backendless with ReactJS”. In this series, we will familiarize you with a number of Backendless features, show you how to use our real-time database with React-Redux store, show you how to deploy your app to Backendless File Storage, and demonstrate how to easily inject the JS-SDK into your ReactJS application.

Create a Web App Using React and Backendless

If you have experience with AngularJS and would like to learn how to build an app with Backendless using that language, you can check out our previous series of articles:

In this article, as was the case with our Angular series, we will start by creating a new Backendless App and building a simple React app. Our demo app will be an Address Book app, so to get started we will show how to load and display some data from the server. In the future, we will modernize the application by adding more functionality.

Let’s get started!

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For this series, we are developing an iOS game called “TapMe”. As TapMe is a multiplayer game, it provides registration for the new users and login for the existing ones. In this article, we are going to demonstrate how to handle user registration and login, as well as how to store a player’s information in the database.

The source code for the game is available in the author’s personal Github repo: https://github.com/olgadanylova/TapMe.git

You can read Part 1 of this series here.

Develop an iPhone Game App

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Some Backendless users choose to use REST APIs in their JavaScript projects. While many can simply use our pre-packaged JS-SDK, that SDK may not always be able to achieve the result the user is seeking. Today we’re going to show you how to build a custom and very light API client library for working with Backendless API. Some time ago, we created a simple NPM module named “backendless-request” for sending CRUD requests to the server. That package is used in all our services such as DevConsole, JSCodeRunner, JS-SDK, etc.. If you would like to see the sources of the package, you can find it on Github.

Light REST Client using JavaScript

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Creating unique IDs using Backendless countersFor each entry in a given table, Backendless creates a unique objectId  property – this is a UUID. In some cases, you may want to have a unique ID based on a whole number. To do this, we will use Backendless Atomic Counters (you can read the documentation about Atomic Counters here). In this article, we will use JavaScript business logic to create a handler that will add a unique value before creating the object. You can then store that value in your table to provide the ID you’re looking for.

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How to Enable Push Notifications in a React Native Android App

React Native helps you build a real native mobile application using JavaScript (for more information about React Native, you can check out the documentation on Github here). The Backendless JavaScript SDK (JS-SDK) already has full compatibility with React Native – just install it from NPM, require in your code, and go. But since the release of Backendless 5.2.x, having only the JS-SDK is not enough to access all the Backendless features; in some cases, we need to have access to native modules for working with certain features such as Push Notifications. We’ve therefore decided to create another module on JS for using exactly in a React Native environment. It’s a patch of sorts for JS-SDK.

In this article series, I’m going to show you how to use this additional JS module. There are will be a total of 3 articles:

  • How to enable Push Notifications using Backendless in a React Native App (Android)
  • How to enable Push Notifications using Backendless in a React Native App (iOS) (coming soon)
  • How to customize Push Notifications using Backendless (coming soon)

Today, we get started with creating a simple Android application on React Native for receiving Push Notifications. Alright, let’s do it.

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It is common for developers to build apps where users will have varying access to data and elements within the app based on the user’s role. Being able to limit user access is important to data security, user management, and often, the financial success of the application as user access is commonly tied to how much the user pays. In this article, we are going to show you how you can hide some object properties based on the user’s role. To accomplish this, we will be using Event Handlers.

Hiding Object Properties

An event handler is custom, server-side code that responds to an API event. For every API call, Backendless generates two types of events – “before” and “after”. The “before” event is fired before the default logic of the API implementation is executed and the “after” event is triggered right after the default API implementation logic. An event handler can respond to either one of these events. A synchronous (blocking) event handler participates in the API invocation chain and can modify the objects in the chain’s flow. For example, the “before” event handlers can modify arguments of the API calls, so the default logic gets the modified objects. Similarly, an “after” handler can modify the return value (or exception) so the client application that made the API request receives the modified value. For more about Event Handlers, you can read the documentation.

By the end of this guide, you will have a Backendless application with a custom API event handler that modifies objects received from a table and removes restricted properties based on the user’s role.

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Amazon Elasticsearch Service (Amazon ES) is a service that can store a lot of data and provide a full text-based search, among other cool features. In this article, we’ll show you how to integrate Amazon ES with your Backendless project.

Save objects to Amazon ES

To save objects to the Amazon ES with Backendless you have to:

  1. Create an Amazon ES domain
  2. Create after event handlers in the Backendless console
  3. Download generated code
  4. Write JavaScript code to save objects
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It is very easy to use Backendless with Xamarin, Microsoft’s open source native app builder. You can try out Xamarin for building apps for free with the Community edition of Visual Studio from Microsoft. In this post, we’re going to create a simple example based on the Xamarin ToDo list sample provided by Xamarin.

Backendless with Xamarin

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One of the most powerful features that Backendless 5 has available is the capability for you to implement your own License Manager for creating and checking licenses for your product/customers. In this article, we will touch on some Backendless services such as data management and Business Logic and we will use one of the Backendless Client SDKs.API Service Simple Licenses Manager

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Developing apps can be fun especially if you can do it without knowing how to write code. There is a lot of hype around the no-code and low-code trends, however, very few solutions can actually demonstrate successful examples. Here’s real proof of a mobile chat app built without any coding. The app is built using Dropsource and Backendless. Some companies will quote you thousands of dollars to built something similar, however, with the demonstrated approach, not only you can do it in a matter of hours using a beautiful UI builder right in the browser, you get the extreme scalability with the Backendless mobile backend. The video below demonstrates the app and walks you through the process of developing it:

Posted in Codeless, Examples
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