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Examples (24 posts)

The mission of Backendless is to simplify the app development process. We strive to empower software developers to build apps without spending any time on monotonous and repetitive coding tasks. In most cases, a developer working with Backendless should not even think about the server-side and focus entirely on the user experience. We have seen thousands of apps getting built the standard way – that is using code. Whether it is Java, Objective-C, Swift, JS or C#, developers still write, compile, debug and profile code when building the client-side of their mobile apps. Can the process be simpler? Wouldn’t it be awesome if you could build a mobile app without knowing a programming language? Or better yet, how cool would it be if you could get all the boring and annoying parts of creating a skeleton of a mobile app using an easy-to-use and a powerful UI and after that jump into the code to handle more advanced tasks at that level? Yes, that would be awesome. What’s even more awesome is that such a solution is available now and it integrates nicely with Backendless. Welcome to Dropsource – a platform for developing mobile apps without any coding. And if you want to get the code, it will generate a complete Android Studio or Xcode project for you.

As the saying goes, it is better to see something once than to hear about it a thousand times. The video below starts with a demo of a mobile (iOS) client-server app built with Dropsource. This is a classic ToDo app which uses the Backendless database to store data and demonstrates a complete set of the database operations (Create, Retrieve, Update, Delete – CRUD). Right after the demo in the video, there is a detailed walkthrough showing how to build the app. If you follow the instructions, you will be developing the same app and learn how to use Dropsource and integrate it with Backendless. Enjoy!

This is Part 2 of a series of articles where you and I build a mobile app without any coding. The app we are working on is a ToDo app.  In the previous post you did the following:

  • Set up your Backendless (backend) account.
  • Set up your Dropsource (frontend) account.
  • Implemented (without any coding of course) application lifecycle.
  • Implement the landing page for the mobile app.

In this part of the series, you will implement the following:

  • The Login Page of the app.
  • A page which lists all the to do tasks (the Listing page).
  • Implement routing between the Login and the Listing pages.

By the end of this part of the development process, you will be able to run the application as shown in the animation below:
first app run - Developing a mobile application without any coding using Backendless and Dropsource (Part2)

Let’s get started (or technically continue, since we started in the previous post).

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Posted in Codeless, Examples

In one of my previous articles, I showed how to develop a custom Alexa skill using an example of a Trip Planner app  (How To Build A Dialogue Custom Alexa Skill Using JavaScript (Without Lambda). In this article I will show you a more complex example of the interaction between Alexa and the user. Today will build a  “Guess My Number” game where Alexa (or technically the skill) thinks of a number and the user tries to guess it while the skills suggests whether it is lower or higher. Here’s a sample dialogue a user may have with Alexa once you implement the skill:
guess my number example1 153x300 - Developing a Custom Skill for an Alexa Game guess my number example2 152x300 - Developing a Custom Skill for an Alexa Game

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Did you know you can use the Backendless Code Generator, which is a part of Backendless Console, to easily generate a simple real-time chat application for iOS, Android and JavaScript? You get full source code and can see how to use Backendless APIs for sending text-based chat messages in real time. In this article I will describe how to modify the generated iOS application so you can send both pictures and text messages.

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Posted in Examples, iOS, Messaging

If you played or used Data Retrieval API in Backendless Cloud you may know that the server limits the number of objects retrieved from a table to 100 in a single call. For Managed Backendless and for Backendless Pro, this limit is configurable.  In order to retrieve more than 100 objects,  data paging is required. Paging greatly improves your application performance, but requires you to think how to architect your app in a certain way.

In this article I’ll describe how to get more than 100 objects, while using the minimum number of API calls, and do it without writing any code at all.  Using this methodology, all that is needed to retrieve all objects from the database is a single call from the client application to the Backendless server.

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What does  “mobile-to-web cross login with a QR code” mean ? It is one of the approaches for the two-factor authentication. Suppose that a user is already authenticated in your application (in my example it would be an android app) and the user wants to use it’s actual session to perform an automatic authentication in another application (in my case it’s a web app). There are several examples of popular apps which use this approach. For example, to login into a web session with WhatsАpp, you must login on your phone and then scan a QR code in the web interface.login with qr1 - How to implement mobile-to-web cross login using a QR code

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With the introduction of the real-time database, Backendless is a great platform for developing games, especially multi-user ones. In this series of posts, I will be showing to you how to build a game for iOS with Swift using Backendless. For a quick overview of the game in action, please watch the video below:

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Posted in Examples, iOS

Backendless SDK for iOS has received several improvements which increased the portability of our code. As a result, the same library you use for the iOS apps can also be used in tvOS and watchOS apps. All the functionality available in our SDK is available in these two environment, this includes real-time database and real-time messaging. The Backendless APIs are the same as for iOS when using them in tvOS and watchOS apps.  Below is a video with a demo of a tvOS app which shows the real-time database in action. The source code of the application demonstrated in the video is available at:

https://github.com/Backendless/AppleTvDemo

This is a very exciting improvement for the SDK as it opens up new opportunities for the developers who look to expand their reach to different types of Apple devices.

Posted in Examples, iOS, tvOS, Video

Video broadcasting and streaming is one of the coolest features of Backendless. Our Media Service API enables client-server functionality for working with live and on-demand audio and video content. A mobile application which uses the Media Service API can broadcast audio and video from the device’s cameras and microphone. Backendless automatically handles streaming of the received media content to other clients or recording of the content on the server. The API can also support the capability to stream a pre-recorded (on-demand) content managed by the Media Service. More details about these features are available in the Media Service documentation.

This post describes how to build an iOS application using the Swift language. The app will record a video on the server and then subsequently play it back.

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In my previous post I reviewed the user registration API. Now that you know how to use the registration API and have a registered user, the next step is to review the login functionality. The video below focuses on the apps’ login screen and the Backendless Login API.

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