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ReactJS is one of the best and most popular frontend frameworks available for app builders. The barriers to entry in terms of understanding how to develop an app with ReactJS are very low, which is why many JavaScript developers choose the ReactJS library for web or mobile applications. It also works very well with a large number of data providers. Therefore, today we are beginning a series of articles about “How to use Backendless with ReactJS”. In this series, we will familiarize you with a number of Backendless features, show you how to use our real-time database with React-Redux store, show you how to deploy your app to Backendless File Storage, and demonstrate how to easily inject the JS-SDK into your ReactJS application.

Create a Web App Using React and Backendless

If you have experience with AngularJS and would like to learn how to build an app with Backendless using that language, you can check out our previous series of articles:

In this article, as was the case with our Angular series, we will start by creating a new Backendless App and building a simple React app. Our demo app will be an Address Book app, so to get started we will show how to load and display some data from the server. In the future, we will modernize the application by adding more functionality.

Let’s get started!

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Some Backendless users choose to use REST APIs in their JavaScript projects. While many can simply use our pre-packaged JS-SDK, that SDK may not always be able to achieve the result the user is seeking. Today we’re going to show you how to build a custom and very light API client library for working with Backendless API. Some time ago, we created a simple NPM module named “backendless-request” for sending CRUD requests to the server. That package is used in all our services such as DevConsole, JSCodeRunner, JS-SDK, etc.. If you would like to see the sources of the package, you can find it on Github.

Light REST Client using JavaScript

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How to Enable Push Notifications in a React Native Android App

React Native helps you build a real native mobile application using JavaScript (for more information about React Native, you can check out the documentation on Github here). The Backendless JavaScript SDK (JS-SDK) already has full compatibility with React Native – just install it from NPM, require in your code, and go. But since the release of Backendless 5.2.x, having only the JS-SDK is not enough to access all the Backendless features; in some cases, we need to have access to native modules for working with certain features such as Push Notifications. We’ve therefore decided to create another module on JS for using exactly in a React Native environment. It’s a patch of sorts for JS-SDK.

In this article series, I’m going to show you how to use this additional JS module. There are will be a total of 3 articles:

  • How to enable Push Notifications using Backendless in a React Native App (Android)
  • How to enable Push Notifications using Backendless in a React Native App (iOS) (coming soon)
  • How to customize Push Notifications using Backendless (coming soon)

Today, we get started with creating a simple Android application on React Native for receiving Push Notifications. Alright, let’s do it.

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One of the most powerful features that Backendless 5 has available is the capability for you to implement your own License Manager for creating and checking licenses for your product/customers. In this article, we will touch on some Backendless services such as data management and Business Logic and we will use one of the Backendless Client SDKs.API Service Simple Licenses Manager

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This is Part 2 of a series of articles where you and I build a mobile app without any coding. The app we are working on is a ToDo app.  In the previous post you did the following:

  • Set up your Backendless (backend) account.
  • Set up your Dropsource (frontend) account.
  • Implemented (without any coding of course) application lifecycle.
  • Implement the landing page for the mobile app.

In this part of the series, you will implement the following:

  • The Login Page of the app.
  • A page which lists all the to do tasks (the Listing page).
  • Implement routing between the Login and the Listing pages.

By the end of this part of the development process, you will be able to run the application as shown in the animation below:
first-app-run

Let’s get started (or technically continue, since we started in the previous post).

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Posted in Codeless, Examples

Development of mobile applications generally requires two parts: the Backend and the Frontend.  Of course, you could limit it only to the client-side, but if there is some data which must be stored on the server, there is no way to get around having a backend. In this series of articles, you will create a native mobile client-server application – a basic ToDo app. Backendless will take care of the backend, it gives you everything you might expecting from the server-side (user management, data persistence and scalability to name a few). And for the client side you will use the Dropsource service.  In case if you are not familiar with this service, you can learn more about that from their website, but in short, it is an awesome service which lets you build native mobile apps without any coding. At the end of this series, your will have a native mobile application with the User Registration/Login screen, a screen with a listing of the ToDo items and a screen to create a new ToDo Item. Here’s a brief preview of the app along with real-time changes in the Backendless database:
todo-demo-codeless

Let’s go!

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Posted in Android, Codeless, iOS

Today we will talk about how to monitor client’s Real-Time Connections in your Angular application. This tutorial continues the guide on how to build Angular apps with Backendless. It is recommended to check out the previous article in this series before you continue for the reason that we will use the application from the previous post as the starting point for this tutorial. Alternatively, if you just want to start working with the it right away, just download the source code from this GitHub commit.

In many cases we want to see how many application users are online or offline, for example, it might be useful in a chat application. For the demo purposes,  in our application we will add a simple counter for count all connected clients. As we explore adding that functionality,  you will meet with Backendless Business Logic, Backendless Counters, Codeless and keep discovering Real-Time features:

image11

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Great news, guys! Backendless 5 is now released and it’s time to show you some new features we’ve been working on.  In this article we will talk about how to integrate the Backendless Real-Time Database into your Angular application. Meanwhile, you can check out the previous version of our Angular app in this post. In case you haven’t read the post and don’t have that app  yet, please review the previous article, because we will use that application as a starting point for this tutorial. Or, if you just want to start working with the it right away, just download the source code from this GitHub commit.

ezgif-5-83e7494ea4

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Today we will talk about the integration of Backendless into your AngularJS/TypeScript app. You will create a simple Address Book application where all the application data will be stored in the Backendless mobile backend. The main goal of this article is to provide step-by-step instructions and to show how to create an Angular application with Backendless mBaaS.

BackendlessAngular-10

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