Message:

Data Import (3 posts)

How to Use Code Generation to Work with Backendless Data

In Java, entity objects are classes that represent data from your table. From an object-oriented perspective, these objects are built to encapsulate your data in the real-world problem domain. There are two different ways you can work with entity objects:

  • Using the HashMap approach (like plain representation of column names and their values);
  • Using the data binding approach, where the particular type is used for every table.

The first approach is more flexible, but it doesn’t offer security for the type values. Also, it’s possible to make a mistake setting the data. It also requires you to remember the names of the columns. 

The second approach is much more appealing in terms of the readability and understandability of the code. It also offers type safety.

The main drawback here is the necessity to write data binding objects (or entity objects if you prefer) that will represent the particular table. And what if you have a very large number of tables in your application, and every table consists of many columns? The amount of such tedious work could be significant. But don’t fret, Backendless is already doing it for you!

Continue reading

Previously I described a feature where you can import data to Backendless using CSV files. In that post I used CSV files which already had the data type defined for each column. For example:
location-csv-contents

Continue reading

Backendless can create tables when you store object hierarchies from a client application. Also, I described how to manually create data tables using Backendless console. Finally, there is one more approach which makes table creation as simple as it gets. The approach is by uploading a file which contains schema definition for every table. The schema definition may include data types for all columns, including the ones for relations. As a part of my quest to build a restaurant to-go order app, I created all the tables in my Backendless backend. I used the schema export feature (to be discussed in the future) which generated for me a ZIP file with the schema definitions for all the tables used by the app.

Continue reading
Find us in facebook