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Monthly Archives

June, 2014

Back for round #2, eh? (if you missed the first post which was about registering users, read it here) Well, let’s dive in. This one should be pretty quick.

The following code is pretty well commented, ping me if you have any questions.

This should bring back something similar to:

Notice the Backendless specific things, we didn’t create those fields in our previous post when we added this user to the database.

  • objectId
  • userStatus

Don’t panic, Backendless adds these automatically. Here’s our expected fields we created in the first post:

  • username
  • email
  • password…..wait, what the?!?! Where’s the password?!

I was expecting to be able to see the password when we query the user info, however, for security Backendless encrypts the password info in a one-way method that even they (or you as the admin of your user table) can’t retrieve. If a user forgets their password, you’ll have to build in the functionality for them to reset it.

I don’t have all the answers, so I hit up their great community and got a response. Check my post here for a more in depth explanation of their encryption.

How do you get the data to compare what the user is entering VS what’s stored on the backend? That’s where the login functionality comes in to play. We’ll hit that up in the next post.

My mission is to keep these posts nice and bite-sized. I don’t want to overwhelm you with tons of functionality. I’m mirroring Backendless’s docs for the REST API.

See you soon!

Mario

This post will go over the basics of integrating Backendless services into the Corona framework…

First, create your Backendless account and obtain the “application-id” and “secret key”. Keep those handy, you’ll be using them throughout these tutorials.

At present, there is not a proper, Corona-specific API plugin so we’ll be using the REST API for Backendless. A handy link can be found here for the REST documentation.

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Scheduled tasks or background jobs is a common requirement for a lot of applications. Backendless supports this concept through a feature we call Timers. A timer is a form of custom server-side code which runs on a pre-defined schedule. This video demonstrates the process of developing a timer, testing it in the debug mode and publishing into the production environment. This is our second video reviewing custom server code. The first video is available in the “Developing Custom Server Code with Backendless mBaaS” blog post.

As an mBaaS platform we frequently say “no server-side coding is required”. This is true for a lot of apps, however, at times it is necessary to shift some application logic to the server-side. The logic may need to alter or extend the default implementation of the core services. Adding custom business logic is not only easy with Backendless, but the process is really cool and exciting. The combination of a code generator with the local debugging option makes it a killer feature. The video below will walk you through the process of adding custom business logic to Backendless. Enjoy!

Geolocation is one of the core services of Backendless.

Using the Geolocation API you can easily add a sense of location to your application. Backendless provides a powerful mechanism for metadata-based searches in a geographic area (rectangle or radius). The latest release of Backendless includes an entirely rewritten Geolocation management interface in the Backendless Console.

This video provides an overview of the capabilities we added to the product:

We just pushed a new release to our production servers. The release includes multiple new features and a ton of improvements. Below is a summary of what went into the release. There will be a blog post with a video providing an in-depth review of each new feature:

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